1902 Victorian

Bringing our old house out of the disco era and back into the Victorian.

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Monday, January 23, 2006

Bathroom Museum

We finally finished the bathroom demo! Are you proud? I'm proud.

We made all sorts of discoveries in this last leg of the demo, particulary one that will change around the whole bathroom layout - for the better, I think.

But I had cat/vet issues this morning, so I didn't have time to upload the pics. Tomorrow, I promise!

Our friend who is renovating the house across the street stopped by to survey our progress this weekend. While there, she mentioned that the two cast iron tubs she took out of her house (she'll be returning them to the house, don't worry!) each had dates stamped on the bottom.

I had the bright idea to get all prison-fabulous and use a mirror to check under our clawfoot tub without having to lift it.

We saw some words, which we couldn't make out, but no date, so Darwin ended up turning the tub on its side anyway. In the end, we found no date, but we did find that the tub was made by Wolff Manufacturing.

So I scurried off to the Internet to see what I could find. I didn't learn much about Wolff because I got distracted by the Vintage Plumbing Web site. The word "vintage" gets applied to everything pre-last week, but the stuff on this site is REALLY AND TRULY antique. I felt giddy browsing through this stuff! Euphoric!

It was like strolling through a bathroom museum. Nevermind that I can't afford one single thing on that site. I'm just glad it exists! After viewing this site - and the latest special findings in the bathroom - I'm even more dedicated to making this room special and as close to original as possible. (though I do draw the line at a high-tank toilet, mostly because I ADORE the toilets in this house)

One of the best features of the site is the page full of scans from Victorian bathroom and kitchen catalogues. Lots of inspiration there!

Now, thanks to that page, I think I want this sconce or one similar to it for the bathroom. It's not even ridiculously expensive!

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5 Comments:

halloweenlover said...

Oooh, can't wait to see pictures!

I hope the cats are okay!

I made some bathroom discoveries this weekend, and wished I'd had your phone number because I knew you'd be as excited as I was! I am going to post about it a little later!

1:39 PM  
Anonymous said...

Thank you for that link, I think ;-) I just spent waaay too long cruising that site. And L.A. isn't too far to drive for for groovy bathroom fixtures. Shame, that.

Heidi
http://statelyenglishmanor.typepad.com

3:36 PM  
Greg said...

Wolff was located in Chicago. I don't know when they started or when the ended but they did make some nice stuff. I bought a pair of solid nickel faucets for my bathroom that were too big for me to use. The handles were on the side and the mounts were too close to the wall so they wouldn't turn all the way. The faucets had a patent date of 1888. While I was trying to find some info on the company I read that some places made high-end fixtures out of solid nickel instead of nickel plated brass. This way, if the staff cleaned your bathroom everyday they wouldn't wear off the plating.

How often does your butler clean the bathroom at your house? You may want to look into this.

3:52 PM  
Greg said...

I just went to the Vintage bath site. Very cool. All of those photographs of period kitchens and baths I have already. They are from a book called “Photographs of New York Interiors at the Turn of the Century”. The book is a collection of photographs taken by Joseph Byron. If you want to see how The Better Half lived around the turn of the century you should get the book. I bought a used copy on EBay for around $10. You will not believe the stores these people shopped in, the places they worked, their homes, or their offices. Over the top!

8:49 PM  
John said...

Cool book. It only had some extra money . . .

For anyone with a credit card itching to be used, you can get copies of this book from Abebook or Alibris starting at $5.00 to $7.00 plus shipping.

10:39 AM  

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